Crosswalks

Cross Walks Content ImageThe University District uses high-visibility crosswalks to guide pedestrians to safe crossing locations. These crosswalks provide a consistent message to drivers and pedestrians throughout campus.

As a member of the Illinois campus community, you have likely crossed campus on foot, by bike, on the bus, in a car, or all of the above. No matter how you travel, we all must work together to avoid accidents. While the complete Rules of the Road are available at www.cyberdriveillinois.com, the following list is a brief overview for pedestrians, drivers, and bicyclists.

Pedestrians

  • A crosswalk painted on the street is a warning signal for vehicles to expect pedestrians.
  • As a pedestrian, you should only cross in designated locations. If you must cross at an undesignated location, yield right-of-way to vehicles.
  • Do not dart suddenly into traffic. Give vehicles a reasonable time to respond.
  • When crossing streets, alleys or driveways, look left, right, and then left again for vehicles, buses, and bicycles.
  • Try to make eye contact; this helps you to determine if the driver has seen you.
  • Pedestrians with disabilities may cross a roadway at any point other than within a marked crosswalk or within an unmarked crosswalk where the intersection is physically inaccessible to them, but they shall yield the right-of-way to all vehicles upon the roadway.
  • When walking, you may NOT leave the curb, or other place of safety, into the path of an oncoming vehicle. You must allow sufficient reaction time for oncoming traffic to yield.
  • "DON'T WALK" means DON'T WALK! You are legally bound to obey traffic signals where posted.
  • "STOP FOR PEDESTRIANS" signs do not give pedestrians free reign. Pedestrians are still required to obey signs and signals, and use due diligence.

At Intersections with Pedestrian Signals

  • Busy streets often have timed crossing signals to indicate when pedestrians have the right-of-way. In these situations, you should only cross when you see the "WALK" sign.

At Intersections without Pedestrian Signals

  • Regardless of whether or not crosswalks are painted onto the street, drivers must stop for pedestrians when:
    • The driver is at a stop sign or flashing red light and the pedestrian is on the driver's half of the street.
    • The driver is turning left or right with a red or green light.
    • The pedestrian enters the street before the drivers light changes to green.
  • Except when facing a "WALK" signal, vehicles do NOT have to stop for pedestrians who are waiting on the curb. Pedestrian right-of-way only applies when they are inside the crosswalk.

At Mid-block Crosswalks

  • Drivers must stop for pedestrians crossing at marked crosswalks, even when there is no other traffic control present.
  • When walking or bicycling, you may NOT leave the curb, or other place of safety, into the path of an oncoming vehicle. You must allow sufficient reaction time for oncoming traffic to yield.